dominusvenustas:

In his later years, after recovering from a serious illness, Henri Matisse turned to creating paper cutouts. Works of brilliant intensity. Bright colours and organic shapes from the natural world. Glorious rhythm and movement.

By jove, he did it again.

I have always tried to hide my efforts and wished my works to have a light joyousness of springtime which never lets anyone suspect the labours it has cost me.

- Matisse

 

I wish I could do whatever I liked behind the curtain of “madness”. Then: I’d arrange flowers, all day long, I’d paint; pain, love and tenderness, I would laugh as much as I feel like at the stupidity of others, and they would all say: “Poor thing, she’s crazy!” (Above all, I would laugh at my own stupidity.) I would build my world which while I lived, would be in agreement with all the worlds. The day, or the hour, or the minute that I lived would be mine and everyone else’s — my madness would not be an escape from “reality”.


Joan of Arc by Albert Lynch (1851-1912)
engraving from Figaro Illustre magazine, 1903

Joan of Arc by Albert Lynch (1851-1912)

engraving from Figaro Illustre magazine, 1903

(Source: paintingses)

afro-dominicano:

Representation in STEM: Black Women Making Their Mark in Space and Science

Today, there is an increased push for the American education system to improve their STEM programs as well as to get students to show interest in the fields. It is important to bring attention to some of the African-American females that have, and are still, paving the road for future scientists, astronauts or any STEM degree holders.

These women are just some of the many examples of African-American contributions to science. (Descriptions pertain to the women in the order they appear on the photoset, from up down, left right)

Mercedes Richards PH.D is a professor of astronomy and astrophysics at Pennsylvania State University. Originally from Jamaica, Dr. Richards received her Doctoral degree at the University of Toronto. In 2010 Dr. Richards received the Fulbright Award to conduct research at the Astronomical Institute in Slovakia. research focus is on binary stars; twin stars formed at the same time.

Willie Hobbs Moore PH.D is the first African-American woman to earn a PH.D in physics in 1972. She received it at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. Her thesis research involved important problems in vibrational analysis of macro molecules.

Beth Brown PH.D (1969-2008) was an Astrophysicist in the Sciences and Exploration Directorate at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. Born in Roanoke, VA, she grew up watching Star Trek and Star Wars and was fascinated with space. In 1998, Dr. Brown becoming the first African-American woman to earn a doctorate in Astronomy from the University of Michigan.

Chanda Prescod-Weinstein PH.D is currently a NASA Postdoctoral Program Fellow at the Observational Lab in Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt Maryland. Originally from Los Angeles California Dr. Prescod-Weinstein specializes in theoretical cosmology.

Dara Norman PH.D is a professor at the University of Washington. Dr. Norman grew up in the south side of Chicago Illinois. She went to MIT as an Undergraduate and worked at NASA Goddard in Maryland. Dr. Norman currently specializes in gravitational lensing, large scale structure and quasars (quasi-stellar objects). This year she was honored with the University’s Timeless Award for her contributions and accomplishments to astronomy. In 2009 she was invited to the Star Party at the White House.

Jeanette J. Epps PH.D from Syracuse NY is a NASA astronaut. She received her PH.D in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Marylan in 2000. Dr. Epps was selected in 2009 to be one of the 14 members of the 20th NASA astronaut class. She recently graduated from Astronaut Candidate Training.

Shirley Ann Jackson PH.D is the second African-American woman to earn a PH.D in physics and the first from MIT. In 2009 Dr. Jackson was appointed to serve on the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology. She is currently the President of the Renssalaer Polytechnic Institute.

ppicasso:

People look at the stage curtain entitled ‘the Minotaur’s body dressed as Harlequin’ painted by Picasso in 1936 for Romain Rolland’s play ‘Le 14 Juillet’ at the Abattoirs museum in Toulouse, south of France, on April 28, 2011. The museum will be hosting the ‘Modern and contempory masterpieces’ exhibition from April, 15 to August 21, 2011.

ppicasso:

People look at the stage curtain entitled ‘the Minotaur’s body dressed as Harlequin’ painted by Picasso in 1936 for Romain Rolland’s play ‘Le 14 Juillet’ at the Abattoirs museum in Toulouse, south of France, on April 28, 2011. The museum will be hosting the ‘Modern and contempory masterpieces’ exhibition from April, 15 to August 21, 2011.

1910-again:

Francisco Goya, The Sleep of Reason Produces Monsters, first preliminary drawing for Capricho 1797

1910-again:

Francisco Goya, The Sleep of Reason Produces Monsters, first preliminary drawing for Capricho 1797

amare-habeo:

“La liberté des mers”, 1960 by Pierre Reverdy
Ilustrated by Georges Braque

amare-habeo:

La liberté des mers”, 1960 by Pierre Reverdy

Ilustrated by Georges Braque

1910-again:

Otto Marseus van Schrieck, Snakes, Toads and Butterflies c.1639-1678

1910-again:

Otto Marseus van Schrieck, Snakes, Toads and Butterflies c.1639-1678

red-lipstick:

Deborah Maris Lader (b. 1961, Cleveland, OH, USA) - Working On Wings To Fly      Printmaking

red-lipstick:

Deborah Maris Lader (b. 1961, Cleveland, OH, USA) - Working On Wings To Fly      Printmaking

(Source: saatchiart.com)